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Concrete Economics: The Hamiltonian Approach to Economic Growth and Policy

Published by EH.Net (December 2016) Stephen S. Cohen and J. Bradford DeLong, Concrete Economics: The Hamiltonian Approach to Economic Growth and Policy. Boston: Harvard Business Review Press, 2016. xi + 223 pp. $28 (cloth), ISBN: 978-1-422-18981-8. Reviewed for EH.Net by Richard M. Salsman, Program in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, Duke University. When the U.S. has […]

Arresting Contagion: Science, Policy, and Conflicts over Animal Disease Control

Published by EH.Net (October 2016) Alan L. Olmstead and Paul W. Rhode, Arresting Contagion: Science, Policy, and Conflicts over Disease Control. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2015. x + 465 pp. $50 (cloth), ISBN: 978-0-674-72877-6. Reviewed for EH.Net by Lee A. Craig, Department of Economics, North Carolina State University. In Arresting Contagion, Alan Olmstead and […]

The Economic History of Mexico

The Economic History of Mexico Richard Salvucci, Trinity University   Preface[1] This article is a brief interpretive survey of some of the major features of the economic history of Mexico from pre-conquest to the present. I begin with the pre-capitalist economy of Mesoamerica. The colonial period is divided into the Habsburg and Bourbon regimes, although […]

Reform or Repression: Organizing America’s Anti-Union Movement

Published by EH.Net (June 2016) Chad Pearson, Reform or Repression: Organizing America’s Anti-Union Movement.  Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2016. viii + 303 pp. $55 (cloth), ISBN: 978-0-8122-4776-3. Reviewed for EH.Net by Gerald Friedman, Department of Economics, University of Massachusetts. Even while the Labor Movement is dying, its history thrives.  For a long time, Labor […]

Technological Innovation in Retail Finance: International Historical Perspectives

Published by EH.Net (November 2013) Bernardo Bátiz-Lazo, J. Carles Maixé-Altés, and Paul Thomes, editors, Technological Innovation in Retail Finance: International Historical Perspectives. New York: Routledge, 2011. xvi + 319 pp.  £85/$125 (hardback), ISBN: 978-0-415-88067-1. Reviewed for EH.Net by Peter Wardley, Department of History, Philosophy and Politics, University of the West of England (Bristol). Until recently […]

History of Property Taxes in the United States

Glenn W. Fisher, Wichita State University (Emeritus) Taxes based on ownership of property were used in ancient times, but the modern tax has roots in feudal obligations owned to British and European kings or landlords. In the fourteenth and fifteenth century, British tax assessors used ownership or occupancy of property to estimate a taxpayer’s ability […]

Economic History of Portugal

Luciano Amaral, Universidade Nova de Lisboa Main Geographical Features Portugal is the south-westernmost country of Europe. With the approximate shape of a vertical rectangle, it has a maximum height of 561 km and a maximum length of 218 km, and is delimited (in its north-south range) by the parallels 37° and 42° N, and (in […]

An Economic History of New Zealand in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

John Singleton, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand Living standards in New Zealand were among the highest in the world between the late nineteenth century and the 1960s. But New Zealand’s economic growth was very sluggish between 1950 and the early 1990s, and most Western European countries, as well as several in East Asia, overtook […]

Labor Unions in the United States

Gerald Friedman, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Unions and Collective Action In capitalist labor markets, which developed in the nineteenth-century in the United States and Western Europe, workers exchange their time and effort for wages. But even while laboring under the supervision of others, wage earners have never been slaves, because they have recourse from […]

The History of American Labor Market Institutions and Outcomes

Joshua Rosenbloom, University of Kansas One of the most important implications of modern microeconomic theory is that perfectly competitive markets produce an efficient allocation of resources. Historically, however, most markets have not approached the level of organization of this theoretical ideal. Instead of the costless and instantaneous communication envisioned in theory, market participants must rely […]