JOIN EHA

DONATE

Women Workers in the British Industrial Revolution

Joyce Burnette, Wabash College Historians disagree about whether the British Industrial Revolution (1760-1830) was beneficial for women. Frederick Engels, writing in the late nineteenth century, thought that the Industrial Revolution increased women’s participation in labor outside the home, and claimed that this change was emancipating. 1 More recent historians dispute the claim that women’s labor […]

Women Workers in the British Industrial Revolution

Joyce Burnette, Wabash College Historians disagree about whether the British Industrial Revolution (1760-1830) was beneficial for women. Frederick Engels, writing in the late nineteenth century, thought that the Industrial Revolution increased women’s participation in labor outside the home, and claimed that this change was emancipating. 1 More recent historians dispute the claim that women’s labor […]

In Uncle Sam’s Service: Women Workers with the American Expeditionary Force, 1917-1919

Published by EH.NET (June 2001) Susan Zeiger, In Uncle Sam’s Service: Women Workers with the American Expeditionary Force, 1917-1919. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1999. x + 211 pp. $37.50 (cloth), ISBN: 0-8014-3166-2. Reviewed for EH.NET by Pamela Nickless, Department of Economics, University of North Carolina at Asheville. The image of an aristocratic (beautiful) young […]

Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850

Ivy Pinchbeck, Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850.London: George Routledge, 1930. x + 342 pp. Review Essay by Joyce Burnette, Department of Economics, Wabash College. burnettj@wabash.edu A Pioneer in Women’s History: Ivy Pinchbeck’s Women Workers and the Industrial Revolution, 1750-1850 During the past twenty years economic historians have begun to pay more attention to […]

Widows in European Economy and Society, 1600-1920

Published by EH.Net (August 2017) Beatrice Moring and Richard Wall, Widows in European Economy and Society, 1600-1920. Woodbridge, UK: Boydell Press, 2017. xiii + 327 pp. $120 (hardback), ISBN: 978-1-78327-177-1. Reviewed for EH.Net by Joyce Burnette, Department of Economics, Wabash College. While many books have been written on the role of women in economic history, […]

Brazil in Transition: Beliefs, Leadership, and Institutional Change

Published by EH.Net (January 2017) Lee J. Alston, Marcus Andre Melo, Bernardo Mueller and Carlos Pereira, Brazil in Transition: Beliefs, Leadership, and Institutional Change. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2016. xviii + 259 pp. $39.50 (hardcover), ISBN: 978-0-691-16291-1. Reviewed for EH.Net by Leonardo Weller, São Paulo School of Economics, FGV. Brazil in Transition is an intriguing […]

Everyday Technology: Machines and the Making of India’s Modernity

Published by EH.Net (February 2014) David Arnold, Everyday Technology: Machines and the Making of India’s Modernity. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. iv + 223 pp. $30 (hardcover), ISBN: 978-0-226-92202-7. Reviewed for EH.Net by G.P. Manish, Department of Economics, Troy University. The Indian economy during the colonial era was often viewed as being static and unchanging. […]

Slavery in the United States

Jenny Bourne, Carleton College Slavery is fundamentally an economic phenomenon. Throughout history, slavery has existed where it has been economically worthwhile to those in power. The principal example in modern times is the U.S. South. Nearly 4 million slaves with a market value estimated to be between $3.1 and $3.6 billion lived in the U.S. […]

A History of the U.S. Carpet Industry

Randall L. Patton, Kennesaw State University Paul Krugman (1993, p. 5) has written that “the most striking feature of the geography of economic activity…. is surely concentration” (emphasis in the original). There are few better examples of highly concentrated economic activity than the U.S. carpet industry. Today, carpet mills located within a 65-mile radius of […]