SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
 
Teachers’ Breakfast: 6.45 – 8 AM (Flagship Ballroom). Speaker: Dr. Ann Carlos (University of Colorado at Boulder). Open to those who purchased a ticket.
 
Historians’ Breakfast: 6.45 – 8 AM (Flagship Ballroom). Speaker: Dr. Ann Carlos (University of Colorado at Boulder). Open to those who purchased a ticket.
 
SESSION 3: Saturday 8:30 – 10:00 AM
A: Money, Trade, and Innovation during the Interwar Period(Plaza A)
Chair: Michael Bordo, Rutgers (bordo@economics.rutgers.edu)
 
John Cantwell (Rutgers University) (cantwell@business.rutgers.edu) and Anna Spadavecchia (University of Reading) (a.spadavecchia@henley.reading.ac.uk), “Innovation and British Regions in the Interwar Period.”
            Discussant: Jochen Streb, Hohenheim (Jochen.Streb@uni-hohenheim.de)
 
Masahiko Shibamoto (Kobe University) (shibamoto@rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp) and Masato Shizume (Bank of Japan) (masato.shizume@boj.or.jp), “How Did Takahashi Korekiyo Rescue Japan from the Great Depression?
            Discussant: Albrecht Ritschl, LSE (A.O.Ritschl@lse.ac.uk)
 
Douglas Irwin (Dartmouth College and NBER) (douglas.irwin@dartmouth.edu), “Did France Cause the Great Depression?
Discussant: Marc Flandreau, Graduate Institute, Geneva (marc.flandreau@graduateinstitute.ch)
 
B: Public Health and Demographic Change in Economic History (Plaza B)
Chair:  John Brown, Clark University (JBrown@clarku.edu)
 
Gregory Niemesh (Vanderbilt University) (gregory.t.niemesh@vanderbilt.edu), “Ironing Out Deficiencies: Evidence from the United States on the Economic Effects of Iron Deficiency.”
Discussant:  Rick Steckel, Ohio State (steckel.1@osu.edu)
 
Jonathan Fox (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research) (jfox@demogr.mpg.de) and Mikko Myrskylä (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research) (myrskyla@demogr.mpg.de), “Urban Fertility Responses to Local Government Programs: Evidence from the 1923-1932 U.S.
            Discussant: Martha Bailey, Michigan (baileymj@umich.edu)
 
Alan Barreca, Tulane University and Rand Corporation (abarreca@tulane.edu), Karen Clay, Carnegie Mellon (kclay@andrew.cmu.edu), and Joel Tarr, Carnegie Mellon (jt03+@andrew.cmu.edu), “Coal, Smoke, and Death.”
            Discussant:  Price Fishback (fishback@email.arizona.edu)
 
C: Opiate of the Masses and Capital Accumulation: Religion from the Middle Ages to 19th Century Egypt (Seaport B&C)
Chair:  Steven Nafziger, Williams College (snafzige@williams.edu)
 
Anne McCants (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) (amccants@mit.edu) and Paul Hohenberg (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) (paul.hohenberg1@verizon.net), “Financing Cathedral Construction: an Investment in Social Overhead Capital?
            Discussant: Peter Temin, MIT (ptemin@mit.edu)
 
Jared Rubin (Chapman University) (jrubin@chapman.edu), “Printing and Protestants: Reforming the Economics of the Reformation.
            Discussant:  Jeremiah Dittmar, American University (dittmar@american.edu)
 
Mohamed Saleh (University of Southern California) (msaleh@usc.edu ), “Laborers, Scribes, and Financiers: Modernization and Inter-Religious Human Capital Differentials in Mid- 19th Century Egypt.”
            Discussant : Metin Cosgel, University of Connecticut (metin.cosgel@uconn.edu)
 
Coffee Break: 10.00 – 10.30 AM (Plaza Lobby)
 
SESSION 4: Saturday 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
A: Networks and Markets: Integration and Disintegration (Plaza A)
Chair:  Mark Carlson (Mark.A.Carlson@frb.gov)
 
Alexander J. Field (Santa Clara University) (afield@scu.edu), “Railroads and Productivity Growth During the Depression.”
Discussant:  Douglas Puffert, The King’s College (dpuffert@tkc.edu)
 
John A. James (University of Virginia) (jaj8y@virginia.edu), David F. Weiman (Barnard College) (dfw5@columbia.edu), and James McAndrews (Federal Reserve Bank of New York) (jamie.mcandrews@ny.frb.org), “Panics and the Disruption of Private Payments Networks:  The United States in 1893 and 1907.”
            Discussant: Hugh Rockoff, Rutgers (rockoff@economics.rutgers.edu)
 
Matthias Morys (University of York) (matthias.morys@york.ac.uk) and Martin Ivanov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences) (hadjimartin@abv.bg), “Business Cycles in South-East Europe 1870 – 2000: A Bayesian Dynamic Factor Model.
            Discussant: Eric Chaney, Harvard (echaney@fas.harvard.edu)
  
B: Wages, Kids, and Careers (Plaza B)
Chair: Dan Fetter, Wellesley College (dfetter@wellesley.edu)
 
Andrew Seltzer (Royal Holloway, University of London) (a.seltzer@rhul.ac.uk), “The Impact of Female Employment on Male Wages and Careers: Evidence from the English Banking Industry, 1890-1914.” 
            Discussant: Claudia Goldin, Harvard (cgoldin@fas.harvard.edu)
 
Gregory Clark (University of California, Davis) (gclark@ucdavis.edu) and Neil Cummins (CUNY-Queens College) (neil.cummins@qc.cuny.edu), “The Beckerian Family and the English Demographic Revolution of 1800.
            Discussant: Claudia Goldin. Harvard (cgoldin@fas.harvard.edu)
 
Tomas Cvrcek, Clemson University (tcvrcek@clemson.edu), “Convergence and Catch-up at the Periphery? Living Standards in the Habsburg Empire, 1829 – 1910.”
            Discussant: Max-Stephan Schulze, LSE (m.s.schulze@lse.ac.uk)
 
C: You Call That (Technological) Progress? (Seaport B&C)
Chair: Anne McCants, MIT (amccants@mit.edu)
 
Claudia Rei (Vanderbilt University) (claudia.rei@vanderbilt.edu), “Turning Points in Leadership: Shipping Technology in the Portuguese and Dutch Merchant Empires.
Discussant: Jan DeVries (devries@berkeley.edu)
 
James Bessen (Boston University School of Law) (jbessen@bu.edu), “Was Mechanization De-Skilling? The Origins of Task-Biased Technical Change.”
Discussant:  Bill Lazonick, University of Massachusetts, Lowell (William_Lazonick@uml.edu)
 
Peter Scott (University of Reading) (p.m.scott@reading.ac.uk), “The Origins of the Anglo-American 'Productivity Gap' in Electronics: The British and American Interwar Radio Equipment Industries.”
            Discussant:  Stephen Broadberry, LSE (S.N.Broadberry@lse.ac.uk)
 
Women’s Lunch: Noon – 1:00 PM (Flagship A). Co-organized by Simone Wegge and Juliette Levy. Open to those who purchased a ticket.
 
EHA Business Meeting: 1:00 – 2:00 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all conference participants.
 
Coffee Break: 2.00 – 2.30 PM (Lighthouse 1)
 
Dissertation Session: 2:15 – 4:15 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all conference participants.
 
Presidential Address: 4:45 – 5:45 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all conference participants.
 
Cocktail Reception: 6:30 – 7:30 PM (Lighthouse 2) Open to all conference participants.
 
Banquet: 7:30 – 9:30 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all those who purchased a ticket for this event.
 
President’s Party: 10 PM – 12 AM (Flagship A). Open to all conference participants and those invited by the President.