Economic History Association 2011 Annual Meeting

BostonSkyline

Crises and Turning Points

Annual Meeting of the Economic History Association, Boston, Massachusetts, September 9-11, 2011

See the Meetings Program Booklet here.
Pre-registration is now closed. You can register at the slightly higher rate at the conference.

The Restaurant Guide can be found here.

If the global economic and financial crisis has a silver lining, it is that recent events have heightened awareness among policy makers and the general public of the importance of economic history.  Crises – economic, financial, social, demographic, environmental, and political, to name only a few – are a hardly perennial.  An understanding of their history is essential to begin to understand what if anything is distinctive about the recent experience.  The history of crises continues to be studied from a number of perspectives: in terms of their causes and their consequences, in terms of their changing incidence, in terms of their short-term impact and their longer-term implications for the development of economies and societies.  This conference seeks to bring together scholars engaged in research on these various dimensions of crises and their implications.  

The Program Committee (Richard Grossman, Wesleyan University (Chair), together with Maristella Botticini, Alan Taylor, and Michael Bernstein) are no longer accepting submissions, since the deadline has passed. Submitters should remember, however, that they need to be members of the Economic History Association.  For coauthored papers this requirement applies to the author submitting the proposal.

Papers should in all cases be works in progress rather than accepted or published work. Submitters should let the program committee know at the time of application if the paper they are proposing has already been submitted for publication. Individuals who presented or co-authored a paper given at the 2010 meeting are not eligible for inclusion in the 2011 program. Presenters should submit complete papers to the Program Committee Chair Richard Grossman by August 1, 2011, latest.

Graduate students are encouraged to attend the meeting. The Association offers subsidies for travel, hotel, registration, and meals, including a special graduate student dinner. A poster session welcomes work from dissertations in progress. Applications for the poster session, consisting of a one page abstract, are due no later than 21 May 2011, and should be sent to rgrossman@wesleyan.edu. The dissertation session convened by Kris James Mitchener (Santa Clara University) and Brian Ahearn (University of Oxford) will honor six dissertations completed during the 2010-2011 academic year. Please click here for information on how and to whom to submit your dissertation. The deadline is June 11, 2011. The Alexander Gerschenkron and Allan Nevins prizes will be awarded to the best dissertations on non-North American and North American topics respectively.  Note that a graduate student completing a dissertation may submit a paper proposal or submit his or her thesis for consideration in the dissertation session, but not both.  Those submitting to the dissertation session, however, may also apply to present a poster, although if the dissertation is selected as one of the six finalists, and an invitation to present a poster has been made, it will be withdrawn.

For further information, check http://eh.net/eha/meetings/2011-meeting, which also includes information on travel options to Boston; or contact Meetings Coordinator Jari Eloranta at elorantaj@appstate.edu.

Attachment Size
Restaurant Guide2011.pdf 21.57 KB
EHA 2011 Program FINAL.pdf 1.36 MB

Contact

Economic History Association Meetings Coordinator:
Jari Eloranta, Ph.D
Appalachian State University, Department of History
224 Joyce Lawrence Lane
Anne Belk Hall, Boone, NC 28608, USA
Email: elorantaj@appstate.edu
Phone: (828) 262-6006
Economic History Association Executive Director:
Alex Field
Department of Economics
Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA, 95053
Email: afield@scu.edu
Phone: (408) 554-4348

Graduate Students

Poster Session
Graduate students will be disseminating preliminary results from their thesis in the poster session. The deadline for applications to the poster session has passed.
Those accepted receive travel (maximum of $500 for domestic and $800 for international travel – save receipts!) and hotel subsidies (=shared accommodations with another graduate student).
To ease travel complications, we will provide the poster board. We intend to purchase Hunt Sturdy BoardTM QuickStick(c) Foamboard 20" x 30", White, (Office Max Item #11067061). It claims to have "pressure sensitive adhesive." Just in case, we will also bring tacks and tape.
As you prepare your poster please remember that "Less is More." Think of your poster as an advertisement of your paper, not as the paper itself. Your goal is to engage people in conversation and encourage them to take a copy of your paper home with them. Those who are looking at a poster want to quickly know what question you are asking, why that is an interesting question and what answer you propose. You want people to be able to see everything on your poster from a comfortable distance. That means you will want to large font (minimum 12 pt.). And remember, a picture is worth a thousand words: graphs tell a story much more effectively than words. Is there a graph that captures the puzzle addressed in your paper?
You will want to bring along approximately 25 copies of your paper which interested people can take with them. Be sure to include your name, your affiliation, email address, and a date on your title page. If you have business cards, bring those too.
The posters will be displayed in the foyer where our coffee breaks are held. This will give you maximum exposure in a minimum amount of time. There will be designated times when the poster presenters are asked to be with their posters, namely Friday afternoon and all day Saturday.
Dissertation Awards
Dissertations chosen for presentation at the annual meetings are finalists for these annual awards and will present summaries of their work at the conference. The dissertation session, convened by Kris James Mitchener (Santa Clara University) and Brian Ahearn (University of Oxford), will honor six dissertations completed during the 2010-2011 academic year. The submission deadline is June 11, 2011. The Alexander Gerschenkron and Allan Nevins prizes will be awarded to the best dissertations on non-North American and North American topics respectively.
 
Other Graduate Subsidies
Graduate students can also attend the conference just to get a sense of what the meetings are about. Those interested should contact Meetings Coordinator (Jari Eloranta) to put their name in the mix. There is a limited number of “seats” available. Those chosen will be eligible for a free (shared) hotel room and various discounts.

Book Exhibits

The Economic History Association will hold its 71st Annual Meeting at the Seaport Hotel on September 9-11, 2011. We hope to welcome over 200 participants, including top scholars in the fields of history, economics, and political science, from around the world. We invite you to participate in our tabletop book exhibit, or advertise in our printed program or provide an insert for our registration packets. The Meetings Coordinator and his staff will set up the book display so it is not necessary for publishers to send representatives with special posters and banners, although some will choose to do so to provide a more comprehensive service to our members. The book exhibit is open during the entire conference to all those in attendance. In the past it has been often visited and a source of excitement when the books are auctioned off at half (or less than) the list price.
Please see the letter and forms here (PDF) for further details:
-Booking Exhibit Form
-Books to Be Exhibited Form
-Exibitor Letter of Invitation
If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact Jari Eloranta, the Meeting Coordinator at elorantaj@appstate.edu
We thank you in advance for your interest in our conference!

Sunday

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 11
 
EHA Breakfast: 7 – 8.30 AM (Plaza Lobby). Full breakfast free to all conference participants, compliments of EHA.
 
SESSION 5: Sunday 8:30 – 10:00 AM
A: Banking during the Great Depression (Plaza A)
Chair: Scott Sumner, Bentley University (ssumner@bentley.edu)
 
Mark Carlson (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve) (mark.a.carlson@frb.gov) and Jonathan Rose (Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve) (jonathan.d.rose@frb.gov), “Credit Availability and the Collapse of the Banking Sector in the 1930s.”
            Discussant: Joe Mason, LSU (masonj@lsu.edu)
 
Mrdjan Mladjan (Universitat Pompeu Fabra) (mrdjan.mladjan@upf.edu), “Accelerating into the Abyss: Financial Dependence and the Great Depression.”
            Discussant:  Joe Mason, LSU (masonj@lsu.edu)
 
Patrick Van Horn (New College of Florida) (pvanhorn@ncf.edu) and Gary Richardson (University of California, Irvine and NBER) (garyr@uci.edu), “When the Music Stopped: Transatlantic Contagion During  the Financial Crisis of 1931.”  
            Discussant: Olivier Accominetti (oaccomin@princeton.edu)
 
B: From Here to There and from There to Here: Migration (Plaza B)
Chair: Jerry Friedman, Massachusetts (gfriedma@econs.umass.edu)
 
Ran Abramitzky, Stanford (ranabr@stanford.edu), Leah Boustan, UCLA (lboustan@econ.ucla.edu), and Katherine Eriksson, UCLA (kath722@ucla.edu), “A Nation of Immigrants: Assimilation and Economic Outcomes in the Age of Mass Migration.”
            Discussant: Robert Margo, Boston University (margora@bu.edu)
 
Marianne Wanamaker (University of Tennessee) (wanamaker@utk.edu) and William Collins (Vanderbilt University) (william.collins@vanderbilt.edu), “The Great Migration of African Americans: New Insights from Linked Census Data.”
            Discussant: Chris Minns, LSE (C.Minns@lse.ac.uk)
 
Martina Viarengo, LSE and Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University (martina_viarengo@hks.harvard.edu), Oriana Bandiera, LSE (o.bandiera@lse.ac.uk), and Imran Rasul, University College London (i.rasul@ucl.ac.uk), “The Making of Modern America: Accounting for Migratory Inflows and Outflows During the Age of Mass Migration.”
            Discussant: Farley Grubb, Delaware (grubbf@udel.edu)
 
Coffee Break: 10.00 – 10.30 AM (Plaza Lobby)
 
SESSION 6: Sunday 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM (Plaza A)
 
A: Financial Markets in Peace, War, and Civil Unrest
Chair: Eric Hilt, Wellesley College (ehilt@wellesley.edu)
 
Caroline Fohlin (Johns Hopkins University) (fohlin@jhu.edu), “Transforming the NYSE: Market Microstructure and Liquidity during World War I.
Discussant: David Chambers, Judge Business School, Cambridge (d.chambers@jbs.cam.ac.uk)
 
Hans-Joachim Voth, Pompeu Fabra (jvoth@crei.cat), Jacopo Ponticelli, Pompeu Fabra (jacopo.ponticelli@upf.edu), “Austerity and Anarchy: A Century of Fiscal Consolidation and Social Unrest.
Discussant: Marc Weidenmier, Claremont McKenna (marc.weidenmier@claremontmckenna.edu)
Stefan Houpt, Carlos III, Madrid (shoupt@clio.uc3m.es) and Stefano Battilossi, Carlos III, Madrid (battilos@clio.uc3m.es), “Predicting Institutional Collapse? Financial Markets and Political Violence at the Onset of the Spanish Civil War.
Discussant: Marc Weidenmier, Claremont McKenna (marc.weidenmier@claremontmckenna.edu)
 
B: Can You Spare a Dollar/Guilder/Quid Until Payday? Small Scale Lending from the 17th to 20th Centuries (Plaza B)
Chair: Martha Olney, University of California, Berkeley (olney@econ.berkeley.edu)
 
Christiaan van Bochove, Utrecht (C.J.vanBochove@uu.nl) and Ton van Velzen, Dutch National Archives (ton.van.velzen@nationaalarchief.nl), “Loans for Salaried Employees: The Case of the Dutch East India Company, 1602-1795.”  
  
Eoin McLaughlin (University of Edinburgh) (eoin.mclaughlin@ed.ac.uk), “Regulation and Crises in Microfinance: Irish Loan Fund Societies, 1830-1914.”
 
 Gunnar Trumbull (Harvard Business School) (gtrumbull@hbs.edu), “Regulating for Legitimacy: Consumer Credit Access in France and America.”
 
Discussant: Timothy Guinnane, Yale (timothy.guinnane@yale.edu)
 
Conference ends at noon.

Saturday

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10
 
Teachers’ Breakfast: 6.45 – 8 AM (Flagship Ballroom). Speaker: Dr. Ann Carlos (University of Colorado at Boulder). Open to those who purchased a ticket.
 
Historians’ Breakfast: 6.45 – 8 AM (Flagship Ballroom). Speaker: Dr. Ann Carlos (University of Colorado at Boulder). Open to those who purchased a ticket.
 
SESSION 3: Saturday 8:30 – 10:00 AM
A: Money, Trade, and Innovation during the Interwar Period(Plaza A)
Chair: Michael Bordo, Rutgers (bordo@economics.rutgers.edu)
 
John Cantwell (Rutgers University) (cantwell@business.rutgers.edu) and Anna Spadavecchia (University of Reading) (a.spadavecchia@henley.reading.ac.uk), “Innovation and British Regions in the Interwar Period.”
            Discussant: Jochen Streb, Hohenheim (Jochen.Streb@uni-hohenheim.de)
 
Masahiko Shibamoto (Kobe University) (shibamoto@rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp) and Masato Shizume (Bank of Japan) (masato.shizume@boj.or.jp), “How Did Takahashi Korekiyo Rescue Japan from the Great Depression?
            Discussant: Albrecht Ritschl, LSE (A.O.Ritschl@lse.ac.uk)
 
Douglas Irwin (Dartmouth College and NBER) (douglas.irwin@dartmouth.edu), “Did France Cause the Great Depression?
Discussant: Marc Flandreau, Graduate Institute, Geneva (marc.flandreau@graduateinstitute.ch)
 
B: Public Health and Demographic Change in Economic History (Plaza B)
Chair:  John Brown, Clark University (JBrown@clarku.edu)
 
Gregory Niemesh (Vanderbilt University) (gregory.t.niemesh@vanderbilt.edu), “Ironing Out Deficiencies: Evidence from the United States on the Economic Effects of Iron Deficiency.”
Discussant:  Rick Steckel, Ohio State (steckel.1@osu.edu)
 
Jonathan Fox (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research) (jfox@demogr.mpg.de) and Mikko Myrskylä (Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research) (myrskyla@demogr.mpg.de), “Urban Fertility Responses to Local Government Programs: Evidence from the 1923-1932 U.S.
            Discussant: Martha Bailey, Michigan (baileymj@umich.edu)
 
Alan Barreca, Tulane University and Rand Corporation (abarreca@tulane.edu), Karen Clay, Carnegie Mellon (kclay@andrew.cmu.edu), and Joel Tarr, Carnegie Mellon (jt03+@andrew.cmu.edu), “Coal, Smoke, and Death.”
            Discussant:  Price Fishback (fishback@email.arizona.edu)
 
C: Opiate of the Masses and Capital Accumulation: Religion from the Middle Ages to 19th Century Egypt (Seaport B&C)
Chair:  Steven Nafziger, Williams College (snafzige@williams.edu)
 
Anne McCants (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) (amccants@mit.edu) and Paul Hohenberg (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute) (paul.hohenberg1@verizon.net), “Financing Cathedral Construction: an Investment in Social Overhead Capital?
            Discussant: Peter Temin, MIT (ptemin@mit.edu)
 
Jared Rubin (Chapman University) (jrubin@chapman.edu), “Printing and Protestants: Reforming the Economics of the Reformation.
            Discussant:  Jeremiah Dittmar, American University (dittmar@american.edu)
 
Mohamed Saleh (University of Southern California) (msaleh@usc.edu ), “Laborers, Scribes, and Financiers: Modernization and Inter-Religious Human Capital Differentials in Mid- 19th Century Egypt.”
            Discussant : Metin Cosgel, University of Connecticut (metin.cosgel@uconn.edu)
 
Coffee Break: 10.00 – 10.30 AM (Plaza Lobby)
 
SESSION 4: Saturday 10:30 AM – 12:00 PM
A: Networks and Markets: Integration and Disintegration (Plaza A)
Chair:  Mark Carlson (Mark.A.Carlson@frb.gov)
 
Alexander J. Field (Santa Clara University) (afield@scu.edu), “Railroads and Productivity Growth During the Depression.”
Discussant:  Douglas Puffert, The King’s College (dpuffert@tkc.edu)
 
John A. James (University of Virginia) (jaj8y@virginia.edu), David F. Weiman (Barnard College) (dfw5@columbia.edu), and James McAndrews (Federal Reserve Bank of New York) (jamie.mcandrews@ny.frb.org), “Panics and the Disruption of Private Payments Networks:  The United States in 1893 and 1907.”
            Discussant: Hugh Rockoff, Rutgers (rockoff@economics.rutgers.edu)
 
Matthias Morys (University of York) (matthias.morys@york.ac.uk) and Martin Ivanov (Bulgarian Academy of Sciences) (hadjimartin@abv.bg), “Business Cycles in South-East Europe 1870 – 2000: A Bayesian Dynamic Factor Model.
            Discussant: Eric Chaney, Harvard (echaney@fas.harvard.edu)
  
B: Wages, Kids, and Careers (Plaza B)
Chair: Dan Fetter, Wellesley College (dfetter@wellesley.edu)
 
Andrew Seltzer (Royal Holloway, University of London) (a.seltzer@rhul.ac.uk), “The Impact of Female Employment on Male Wages and Careers: Evidence from the English Banking Industry, 1890-1914.” 
            Discussant: Claudia Goldin, Harvard (cgoldin@fas.harvard.edu)
 
Gregory Clark (University of California, Davis) (gclark@ucdavis.edu) and Neil Cummins (CUNY-Queens College) (neil.cummins@qc.cuny.edu), “The Beckerian Family and the English Demographic Revolution of 1800.
            Discussant: Claudia Goldin. Harvard (cgoldin@fas.harvard.edu)
 
Tomas Cvrcek, Clemson University (tcvrcek@clemson.edu), “Convergence and Catch-up at the Periphery? Living Standards in the Habsburg Empire, 1829 – 1910.”
            Discussant: Max-Stephan Schulze, LSE (m.s.schulze@lse.ac.uk)
 
C: You Call That (Technological) Progress? (Seaport B&C)
Chair: Anne McCants, MIT (amccants@mit.edu)
 
Claudia Rei (Vanderbilt University) (claudia.rei@vanderbilt.edu), “Turning Points in Leadership: Shipping Technology in the Portuguese and Dutch Merchant Empires.
Discussant: Jan DeVries (devries@berkeley.edu)
 
James Bessen (Boston University School of Law) (jbessen@bu.edu), “Was Mechanization De-Skilling? The Origins of Task-Biased Technical Change.”
Discussant:  Bill Lazonick, University of Massachusetts, Lowell (William_Lazonick@uml.edu)
 
Peter Scott (University of Reading) (p.m.scott@reading.ac.uk), “The Origins of the Anglo-American 'Productivity Gap' in Electronics: The British and American Interwar Radio Equipment Industries.”
            Discussant:  Stephen Broadberry, LSE (S.N.Broadberry@lse.ac.uk)
 
Women’s Lunch: Noon – 1:00 PM (Flagship A). Co-organized by Simone Wegge and Juliette Levy. Open to those who purchased a ticket.
 
EHA Business Meeting: 1:00 – 2:00 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all conference participants.
 
Coffee Break: 2.00 – 2.30 PM (Lighthouse 1)
 
Dissertation Session: 2:15 – 4:15 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all conference participants.
 
Presidential Address: 4:45 – 5:45 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all conference participants.
 
Cocktail Reception: 6:30 – 7:30 PM (Lighthouse 2) Open to all conference participants.
 
Banquet: 7:30 – 9:30 PM (Lighthouse 1). Open to all those who purchased a ticket for this event.
 
President’s Party: 10 PM – 12 AM (Flagship A). Open to all conference participants and those invited by the President.

Friday

 
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9
 
Workshop: 9:00 AM – Noon (Seaport A). Conducted by James Fenske (University of Oxford) and Jessica Bean (Denison University).
 
Coffee Break: 10.15 – 11 AM (Seaport and Mezzanine Lobby)
 
Local Tours: (Departure point for the tours is the hotel lobby).
Tour 1: 9 AM – Noon. Walking Tour of Historic Boston. Includes highlights of downtown and Freedom Trail. Led by  Robert Allison, chair of the History Department at Suffolk University in Boston.
Tour 2: 8 AM – 1 PM. Tour of Boott Mill in Lowell. Visit to Lowell, MA, the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution in the US. Highlights of the trip include sites demonstrating water power technology, including turbines and control devices, and a weave room in the Boott Mill. Box lunches will be provided. 
 
Poster Session: 1:00 – 5:00 PM (Plaza Lobby)
 
SESSION 1: Friday 1:00 – 2:30 PM
A: Booms and Busts in the Long Run (Plaza A)
Chair: Alan Taylor, University of Virginia (alan.m.taylor@virginia.edu)
 
Farley Grubb (University of Delaware) (grubbf@udel.edu), “The Collapse of the Continental Dollar: The Turning Point and Its Causes: An Alternative History of Financing the American Revolution, 1775-1781.”
Discussant: Richard Sylla, NYU (rsylla@stern.nyu.edu)
 
Martin Stürmer (University of Bonn) (martin.stuermer@uni-bonn.de), “150 Years of Booms and Busts:  What Drives Mineral Commodity Prices?
            Discussant: Robert Pindyck, MIT (rpindyck@mit.edu)
 
Nathan Sussman (Hebrew University and CEPR) (msussman@mscc.huji.ac.il) and Yishay Yafeh (Hebrew University and CEPR), “Globalization and the Current Financial Crisis in Historical Perspective.” (msyafeh@mscc.huji.ac.il)
            Discussant: Michael Bordo, Rutgers (bordo@economics.rutgers.edu)
 
 
B: Back to the Land (Plaza B)
Chair:  Pinar Keskin, Wellesley College (pkeskin@wellesley.edu)
 
Helen Yang, George Mason (caseyang718@gmail.com), “Risk, Agricultural Technology and Contractual Choice: Evidence from Confucius’s Lineage in Late Qing China (1759-1901)
  
Mats Olsson (Lund University) (Mats.Olsson@ekh.lu.se), Martin Dribe (Lund University) (Martin.Dribe@ekh.lu.se), and Patrick Svensson (Lund University) (Patrick.Svensson@ekh.lu.se), “The Demographic Response to Output Crisis in Rural Society: Grain Production, Mortality and Fertility in 18th and 19th Century Sweden.”
 
Max-Stephan Schulze (London School of Economics) (m.s.schulze@lse.ac.uk) and Oliver Volckart (London School of Economics) (o.j.volckart@lse.ac.uk), “The Long-Term Impact of the Thirty Years War: What Grain Price Data Reveal.
 
Discussant: Paul Rhode, Michigan (pwrhode@umich.edu)
 
Coffee Break: 2.30 – 3 PM (Plaza Lobby)
 
SESSION 2: Friday 3:00 – 4:30 PM
A: Banking, Finance, and Trade in Early Modern and Modern France (Plaza A)
Chair: Eugene N. White, Rutgers (ewhite@economics.rutgers.edu)
 
Guillaume Bazot (Paris School of Economics) (bazot@pse.ens.fr), “Looking on English and German Banking in the French Mirror, Banking and Development in France (1880-1913).”
            Discussant: Caroline Fohlin, Johns Hopkins (fohlin@jhu.edu)
 
Rui Esteves (University of Oxford) (rui.esteves@economics.ox.ac.uk), “The Belle Epoque of International Finance: The French Portfolio, 1880-1913.”
Discussant: Jean-Laurent Rosenthal, California Institute of Technology (rosentha@caltech.edu)
 
Veronica Santarosa (Yale University) (veronica.santarosa@yale.edu), “Financing Long-Distance Trade without Banks: The Joint Liability Rule and Bills of Exchange in 18th-century France.”  
Discussant: Marc Flandreau, Graduate Institute, Geneva (marc.flandreau@graduateinstitute.ch)
 
B: Institutions in the Developing World (Plaza B)
Chair: Noel Maurer, Harvard Business School (nmaurer@hbs.edu)
 
Lee Alston (University of Colorado and NBER) (lee.alston@colorado.edu), Marcus Melo (University of Pernambuco) (marcus.melo@uol.com.br), Bernardo Mueller (University of Brasilia) (bmueller@unb.br), and Carlos Pereira (Michigan State University) (pereir12@msu.edu), “Understanding Development in the Modern World: Power, Beliefs and Institutions, with an application to Brazil, 1960-2010.” 
Discussant:  Aldo Musacchio, Harvard Business School (amusacchio@hbs.edu)
 
Marlous van Waijenburg (Northwestern University) (lousje10@gmail.com)and Ewout Frankema (Utrecht University) (e.frankema@uu.nl), “Structural Impediments to African Growth? Countervailing Evidence from Real Wages in British Africa, 1880-1960.
            Discussant:  Richard Freeman, Harvard and LSE (freeman@nber.org)
 
Martine Mariotti (Australian National University) (martine.mariotti@anu.edu.au), “Impact of African Independence on the Welfare of South African Blacks.”
            Discussant: Richard Freeman, Harvard and LSE (freeman@nber.org)
 
C: Industrialization and Innovation (Seaport B&C)
Chair:  Akira Motomura, Stonehill College (amotomura@stonehill.edu)
 
John Tang (Australian National University) (john.tang@anu.edu.au), “Fukoku kyohei: Evaluating the Impact of Public Investment in Meiji Japan, 1868-1912.” 
            Discussant: Masami Imai, Wesleyan University (mimai@wesleyan.edu)
 
Liam Brunt (Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration) (liam.brunt@nhh.no) and Erik Meidell (Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration) (jan.meidell@stud.nhh.no), “How Fast and How Broad was British Industrialization? Evidence from a Synthetic Occupational Census for 1801.”
            Discussant: Jeffrey G. Williamson, Harvard (jwilliam@fas.harvard.edu)
 
W. Walker Hanlon (Columbia University) (wwh2104@columbia.edu), “Industry Connections and the Geographic Location of Economic Activity: Evidence from 19th Century Britain.”
            Discussant: Jeffrey Williamson (jwilliam@fas.harvard.edu)
 
Plenary Session: 4:45 – 5:45 PM (Lighthouse 1)
Lessons for the Future: International Capital Markets in Historical Perspective. Featuring: Albert Fishlow, (Columbia University), speaker; Alexander Field (Santa Clara University), chair; Jeffry Frieden (Harvard University), commentator.
Reception: 6:30 – 8:30 PM (Baker Hall, Harvard Business School). Open to all conference participants. Note! Buses will pick up guests from the front of the hotel at 6 pm. Transportation back to the hotel from Harvard Business School at 8.30 pm.
 
Journal of Economic History Dinner: 9 – 11 PM (Flagship A). By invitation only!
 
Graduate Student Dinner: 9 PM – 12 AM (Location: TBA). Open to all graduate students.

Schedule

"Rules of the game" for the paper sessions:

  1. The sessions will last 90 minutes each.
  2. Authors will have 15 minutes to present their papers. Session chairs should encourage compliance with this time limit.
  3. The rooms will have standard presentation equipment (laptops with PowerPoint and projectors – Note! EHA does not provide a projector for transparencies!). If you have special needs, please let Jari Eloranta (elorantaj@appstate.edu) know.
  4. All three papers should be presented first. We would suggest using the order in the program.
  5. After all three papers have been presented, the discussants will take the floor. Discussants will have 10 minutes per paper (some discussants have more than one paper to discuss). Session chairs will again encourage compliance with this time limit.
  6. This should leave approximately 15 minutes for discussion from the floor and author/discussant responses.

 
PROGRAM (with links to session papers):   -Friday    -Saturday    -Sunday
SHORT CONFERENCE PROGRAM (in PDF)
 
FULL PROGRAM BOOKLET (in PDF)
 
SHORT VERSION OF THE PROGRAM:
Friday: 
Workshop and Tours
One workshop and several local tour options are available for Friday morning, 8:00-Noon (or 1 pm). Preregistration is required. Enrollment is limited to 35 participants for the workshop, and 30-35 participants for the tours. Sign up for a workshop or tour on the registration form.

  • Workshop: Job Market Tips and Tales. James Fenske (University of Oxford) and Jessica Bean (Denison University) will share their job market experiences.
  • Tour 1: Walking Tour of Historic Boston. Includes highlights of downtown and Freedom Trail. Led by  Robert Allison, chair of the History Department at Suffolk University in Boston.
  • Tour 2: Tour of Boott Mill in Lowell. Visit to Lowell, MA, the birthplace of the Industrial Revolution in the US. Highlights of the trip include sites demonstrating water power technology, including turbines and control devices, and a weave room in the Boott Mill. Box lunches will be provided. 

2 Sessions– 5 Panels

  • Commencing at 1:00 PM

Poster Session
Plenary Session

  • Lessons for the Future: International Capital Markets in Historical Perspective. Featuring: Albert Fishlow, (Columbia University), speaker; Alexander Field (Santa Clara University), chair; Jeffry Frieden (Harvard University), commentator.

Reception

  • A reception will be held Friday evening at the Harvard Business School.

Graduate Student Dinner
 
Saturday:
Teachers’ Breakfast (featuring Ann Carlos, University of Colorado at Boulder, as the speaker)
Historians’ Breakfast (featuring Jan DeVries, University of California at Berkeley, as the speaker)
2 Sessions– 6 Panels
Women’s Lunch (co-organized by Simone Wegge and Juliette Levy)
EHA Business Meeting
Dissertation Session
Presidential Address

  • President Barry Eichengreen will give his presidential address, “Economic History and Economic Policy.”

Banquet

  • Awards will be presented in the areas of best dissertations (Nevins and Gerschenkron prizes), best Journal of Economic Historyarticle of 2010, best Explorations in Economic Historyarticle of 2010, best book in European economic history, and excellence in teaching economic history.

 
Sunday:
2 Sessions– 4 Panels

  • Adjourning at 12:00 PM
Attachment Size
EHA CONFERENCE PROGRAM WEB 2011.pdf 45.18 KB
EHA 2011 Program FINAL.pdf 1.36 MB

Travel

Local Travel:
Here's information on local travel, how to get around in Boston:
Local Transportation (in PDF)
 

Airport
The most convenient airport to reach Boston is the Logan International Airport (http://www.massport.com/logan-airport/Pages/Default.aspx), which is one of the biggest airports in the world. It serves various domestic and international connections.

Directions to Seaport Hotel Boston

FROM Points West via I-90:
Follow the Massachusetts Turnpike/Interstate 90 East to Exit 25 – South Boston. At the top of the ramp, bear left towards Seaport Boulevard. At the first set of lights, proceed straight onto East Service Road. At the next set of lights, take a right onto Seaport Boulevard. The Seaport Boulevard entrance to the Seaport Garage is located ahead on the right.

FROM Points South via I-93:
Heading northbound on I-93 towards Boston, take Exit 20, which will be immediately after Exit 18. Follow the signs to “I-90 East.” Take the first tunnel exit to "South Boston.” At the first set of lights at the top of the ramp, proceed straight onto East Service Road. At the next set of lights, take a right onto Seaport Boulevard. The Seaport Boulevard entrance to the Seaport Garage will be ahead on the right.

FROM Points North via I-93:
Heading southbound on Interstate 93 Boston, take Exit 23, Purchase Street and move into the left lane. At the top of the ramp, take a left turn onto the Evelyn Moakley Bridge/Seaport Boulevard. Follow Seaport Boulevard for approximately .8 miles, the Seaport Boulevard entrance to the Seaport Garage will be on the right, after the Seaport Boulevard/B Street intersection.

FROM Logan International Airport and Route 1A South:
Follow the signs towards I-90 West – Ted Williams Tunnel. Take the Ted Williams Tunnel to Exit 25. At the top of the ramp proceed straight onto B Street. Follow B Street to the end and take a right onto Seaport Boulevard. The Seaport Boulevard entrance to the Seaport Garage will be on your right.

 

Public transportation
The MBTA Silver Line Waterfront (SL1) provides service from the WTC Station to Logan International Airport terminals every 10 minutes during the weekday and every 15 minutes during the weekend. The Silver Line station is located adjacent to the hotel. (THE EHA HIGHLY RECOMMENDS THIS INEXPENSIVE AND CONVENIENT CONNECTION)
Visit the MBTA site for maps

 

Taxi
Seaport Boston is about 3 miles from Logan Airport, one of several hotels near the Boston Convention Center and a quick ride away from all Boston attractions. Taxis are readily available from the lobby of our hotel.

 

Water Taxi
This scenic way to travel is a great way to avoid traffic. Hop on the water taxi shuttle at your terminal and enjoy the ride. The stop for pick up and drop off is at the Seaport World Trade Center, directly across the street from the Seaport hotel.
 

Parking (hotel)
Overnight Parking Rates*
Self Park – $32
Valet – $42
*Overnight parking includes unlimited exit and entry privileges
Hourly Self-Parking Rates
0-1 hours – $9
1-10 hours – $19
10-24 hours – $32
Hourly Valet Parking Rates
0-3 hours – $20
3-10 hours – $32
10-24 hours – $43

Parking (across from the hotel)
Lots that are located right next to the Seaport Hotel and right across the street adjacent to Anthony's Pier IV. Currently they charge $10 if you enter before 9 am. There are signs that are visible from the hotel. Note that these parking structures are operated independently from the hotel.

Attachment Size
Transportation Around Boston.pdf 426.93 KB

Hotel

UPDATE: The conference hotel (Seaport Hotel, see below – there may still be cancellations, so it's possible that odd rooms become available; however, it is not likely) is now full, so the attendees should seek alternative accommodations in Boston. To assist in this regard, the EHA has reserved additional rooms (15 in total) at a nearby hotel at the same nightly rate ($189). The overflow hotel is Renaissance Boston Waterfront Hotel. The deadline to make a reservation is August 26, 2011. 

 

To make the reservation, please follow this link: http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/boswf-renaissance-boston-waterfront-hotel/?toDate=9/11/11&groupCode=echecha&fromDate=9/7/11&app=resvlink

 

 

CONFERENCE HOTEL:
The conference hotel for the 2011 EHA Meetings is the Seaport Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts. You can find more information about the hotel at: http://www.seaportboston.com/. The nightly room rate is $189, plus 14.45% occupancy tax and a $3 per night service inclusive charge (=guests do not need to tip at the hotel). THE DEADLINE FOR GETTING THE GROUP RATE IS AUGUST 24, 2011!
There are two different ways to access the reservation system:
 
Option 1:
Direct guests to click on the link below and then they just have to put in your dates of stay and they can book a room.
https://book.b4checkin.com/seaport/rlpv2/NegotiatedRates.asp?TID=EHG11&CompanyName=Economic%20History%20Association%202011%20Annual%20Meeting
 
Option 2:
Direct guests to the Seaport Main website and on the right hand side of the page in the box “Promo/Group Code” put in EHG11 at: www.seaportboston.com
 
If you have any problems making your reservations, you should contact the hotel directly:
Katie Watson
Conference Manager
SeaportHotel & Seaport World Trade Center
200 Seaport Boulevard, Suite 500| Boston, MA 02210
T  617.385.4351| F  617.217.3726
katie.watson@seaportboston.com

Registration

The online pre-registration for the 2011 EHA meetings is now closed.

You can also register on site at the conference at the slightly higher rate.