About the Economic History Association

The Economic History Association was founded in 1940. Its purpose is to encourage and promote teaching, research, and publication on every phase of economic history, broadly defined, and to encourage and assist in the preservation and administration of the materials for research in economic history. The Association publishes The Journal of Economic History and a Newsletter, and holds an...
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Economic History Association 2015 Annual Meeting

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Diversity in Economic History

Annual Meeting of the Economic History Association, in Nashville, Tennessee, September 11-13, 2015

The theme for EHA 2015 is “diversity” in economic history. Diversity refers to differences in economic outcomes by race, ethnicity or tribal group, religion, location within countries (for example, urban vs. rural, or North vs. South), gender, and other attributes and how these evolve over the course of economic development. Papers documenting these differences in historical settings are welcome, as are papers that measure the impact of various institutions or government policies (for example, the Civil Rights Movement in the United States) or that examine long run trends in economic inequality more broadly construed.

 

For the complete Call for Papers, click here; or contact Meetings Coordinator Jari Eloranta at elorantaj@appstate.eduPaper proposals should include a 3-5 page précis and a 150-word abstract suitable for publication in the Journal of Economic History. Papers should be submitted by January 31, 2015 to ensure consideration.

 

Graduate students are encouraged to attend the meeting. The Association offers subsidies for travel, hotel, registration, and meals, including a special graduate student dinner. For more information refer to the Call for Papers .

2014 Prizes Awarded at Annual Meeting

The Economic History Association announced the 2014 prize winners at the Annual Meeting held recently in Columbus, Ohio.

Joshua Lewis received the Allan Nevins Prize for the Best Dissertation in U.S. or Canadian Economic History, for his dissertation ” The Impact of Technological Change Withing the Home”, completed at the University of Toronto. Advisors: Dwayne Benjamin, Robert McMillan, Aloysius Siow, and Mark Stabile (This prize is awarded on behalf of Columbia University Press.)

Tyler Beck Goodspeed received the Alexander Gerschenkron Prize for the Best Dissertation in non-US or Canadian Economic History, for his dissertation “Essays in British Financial History”, completed at Harvard University. Advisor: Richard Hornbeck

David Weiman, Columbia University, was awarded the annual Jonathan Hughes Prize honoring excellence in teaching economic history.

Martha Bailey, University of Michigan, and Nicolas Duquette, University of Southern California, were awarded the Cole Prize for their article “How Johnson Fought the War on Poverty: The Politics and Economics of Funding at the Office of Economic Opportunity”, published in the June 2014 issue of the Journal of Economic History.

Gavin Wright, Stanford University, was awarded the Alice Hanson Jones Prize for his book, Sharing the Prize: The Economics of the Civil Rights Revolution in the American South(Harvard University Press, 2013)

Congratulations to the 2014 awardees!